Sunday, April 4, 2010

3 Beagle rockets - 12 Q motors!

It appears that the 4Q Beagle rocket is the same as the project Sony rocket.



Now this is good news: this is a cool design and if they have some money behind it, and possibly attempt more than one flight (with more than one rocket), the odds of a good flight are greatly improved. It looks like we may have three! "Dick has built three of these rockets..." Source

It is great to get this kind of attention to the hobby, and a great oppourtunity for these students, but the outside world always tends to really mess up when it comes to rocketry. They are too often misleading, sometimes even just lying: NZ team claims space launch. The most annoying part is when Sony suggests that Sony computers were used to make this rocket. The design begins and ends in the human mind, while computers may have run software that just about any PC made after 2000 could have run. Sony gave the money and web page, which is great. But it is worth repeating that Sony makes arrogant and misleading statements about Sony computers having more power than the first rocket to reach the moon. Why can't they simply sponsor it, run the web page, get their name on the rocket, and leave it at that?

Anyway, here is a picture of this rocket:


Now this would be a small S to a Q flight. That would be a record, and if it flies well, could break the 72 mile altitude record!

There are a bunch of images showing the assembly of one of the rockets on the Sony flicker account.







The coupler looks very strong indeed! hopefully those fins are very strong also, because this is a likely failure point, particularly in the upper stage. Burnout altitude is unknown, but even at 60 or 70,000 feet, the mach numbers will mean a nasty Max Q for the sustainer. The predicted altitude, just above 500,000 feet, indicates a likely burnout of mach 6 or more. Can the fins and fiberglass airframe handle it?

It has not been confirmed, but the rocket in these pictures looks like it may actually have P motors installed right now. It is hard to tell, since I seldom see motors this large in person.

2 comments:

Chrisn said...

Now this answers ALOT of questions, and is loaded with some very useful information.

http://www.rocketpedia.org/index.php/Clotho_Project

Chrisn said...

Now they reckon there is cracks on the motor case... whatever. And now we know its costing about $20,000

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vc4Lrn2-oVg&feature=player_embedded